Contact

News & Insights

Former Chancellor’s comments on French residency spark expat indignation

In an interview with the French English-language newspaper The Connexion, Lawson sounded nonchalant about his decision, suggesting that the bureaucracy surrounding the application and developments such as Etias (the EU visa-waiver plan) were not a concern for himself and shouldn’t be considered so for other expats either.

Application problems for some expats

However, the Guardian reports that many Britons in France have already encountered problems with the residency card paperwork and fulfilling the necessary criteria.

Lawson was unfazed, suggesting that it was just a “tiresome rather than serious” issue.

Campaigners for Expat rights have been quick to react, with many citing the hypocrisy of the issue as well as general disgust for Lawson’s “blasé attitude”.

Debbie Williams, founder of BHOV (Brexpats – Hear Our Voice) said, “His comment about things being tiresome is pretty insulting to thousands of people who are going through a lot of hassle, expense and anxiety to get papers in order, all because of a vote they had no say in. Most folk don’t have the means he has… Like many, his thoughts upon loss of rights seem to relate only to his personal circumstances.”

Concern for the future

For many, the issue of preserving rights for all Britons including current expats is one thing – something Lawson has discussed at length in his reasons for supporting Brexit – but it is the potential loss of freedom of movement and the right to work and travel freely in the EU for future generations that has also sparked indignation.

Labour MP Andrew Adonis tweeted, “Good for Lord Lawson to live in France with full EU rights. Shameful that he is undermining right of others to follow suit.”

Expat financial services providers can help

While we can’t undo the issues caused by Brexit, the team at Blacktower in France and across Europe, can help expats as they approach the eventual shift. By planning in advance and seeking help where you need it, you will be as best prepared as possible when Britain’s exit from the EU finally takes place.

Other News

What next for UK interest rates?

Rising GraphsInterest rates finally rose above 0.5 per cent in August – almost a decade after the emergency cut to that level. The Bank of England’s MPC voted to raise rates to 0.75 per cent on 2nd August, casting aside worries over a no-deal Brexit, as it said that low unemployment merited a hike to keep inflation on target.

The 9-0 vote to raise rates was accompanied by a quarterly Inflation Report, which showed that, despite August’s hike, the market outlook was for rates to go up more slowly over the next three years than previously expected and that no further move is expected until at least the middle of next year. The recent rate rise was widely expected as the Bank had not sent out any signals to dampen forecasts of a hike, unlike in the run-up to the May decision when a move up failed to happen. The question now is whether this is a one-off hike, or the start of a slow but steady rise in interest rates. A lot will depend on how the British economy fares over the rest of this year and into 2019, before the UK’s exit from the EU. If there is a marked slowdown then it is likely that rates will stall again. Even worse, a recession would most likely see a further interest rate cut. 

Read More

Gibraltar will remain “100% British”, says Fabian Picardo

Gibraltar and UK FlagsOne key concern Gibraltarians have about Brexit negotiations is sovereignty, and whether Britain will offer the Rock to Spain in order to get a better deal. With plans still being kept very vague by the British government at this early time, many fear it is a strong possibility.

But now the Chief Minister of Gibraltar, Fabian Picardo, has reassured Gibraltarians that they will remain under British sovereignty.

Read More

Select your country

Please select your country of residence so we can provide you with the most relevant information:

You are currently viewing the Blacktower Financial Management EU website.

You may be looking for the Blacktower United States website.

Blacktower United States > X Stay on this site

Or choose your country.