Contact

News & Insights

Why You Don’t Need A Financial Adviser in This Crisis

The markets rallied because investors gained confidence from the infection curve flattening in Spain and Italy. Then they crashed again…

If the conflicting news are making you want to scream, you’re not the only one. Trying to find the perfect explanation from such complex events, assuming you can figure out exactly why things happened – or what will happen soon – is a fool’s game. Unless you are an economist or journalist, don’t bother trying. I don’t.

“But hold on, isn’t that your job?” It’s not. Yes, I’m a financial adviser, but these last few weeks have been very quiet for me – as they should. My job is to help clients plan for the medium and long term, and that doesn’t change when the markets are going insane (as they often do). Sure, some clients need reassurance, and with some older clients I need to make sure a temporary downturn on the markets won’t affect their retirement, but that’s about it. The less my clients feel the need to speak to me now, the better the job I was doing before this insanity started.

When you are making decisions in response to what the markets are doing, you’re being more emotional than rational. With money, that’s never a good thing. If you don’t have a financial adviser, that’s ok – just sit tight and don’t panic. If you have one who’s busy talking to you about all the ways you should be moving your money around now, put the phone down, wait this out and, as soon as you can leave your house, go find a better adviser.

Related News

Defined Benefit Plan Deficit Raises Questions

Piggy bankA pension transfer is not for everyone and there will be many factors to weigh up before making the decision to transfer from an existing scheme into a QROPS, SIPPs or other structure.

However, a great deal of doubt remains about the long-term viability of the nation’s defined benefit plans, with the high-profile collapse of a number of such schemes leading many to question their reliability and suitability.

And these doubts have only been increased by the recent revelation from Mercer that during 2017/18 the accounting deficit for the defined benefit plans of the UK’s top 350 FTSE organisations increased by 28% to £41 billion, mainly because of a £19 billion drop in asset values (from £766 billion to £747 billion).

Read More

Can expats vote in May’s surprise general election?

Polling Station EntranceFollowing Theresa May’s shock announcement that there will be a general election on June 8, many long-term expats were left wondering if they would get the chance to vote.

Britons who have lived abroad for more than 15 years were previously denied the right to vote in the 2015 general election as well as the EU referendum last year. The latter was viewed as particularly unfair by many seeing as the result of the referendum, Brexit, is likely to have major impact on the future for many British expats.

Read More

Select your country

Please select your country of residence so we can provide you with the most relevant information:

You are currently viewing the Blacktower Financial Management EU website.

You may be looking for the Blacktower United States website.

Blacktower United States > X Stay on this site

Or choose your country.