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Why are our pensions in crisis?

Huge deficits mean around 600 pension funds are certain to collapse in the next decade, according to the Pensions Institute at Cass Business School. It says another 400 are also at risk. These funds have combined deficits of around £45 billion, a figure which could potentially overwhelm the PPF rescue fund.

Britain’s blue chips are dishing out billions more in dividends to shareholders despite a crisis in their pension funds. One investment group analysis shows that 54 companies in the FTSE 100 index have handed out £48billion to investors in the last two years despite having a £52 billion pension black hole.

Another commentator said that insufficient contributions to pension funds could leave companies with hefty liabilities which could drag on future performance and, ultimately, lead to staff receiving lower pensions if the business runs in to difficulties and enters administration.

This communication is for informational purposes only and is not intended to constitute, and should not be construed as, investment advice, investment recommendations or investment research. You should seek advice from a professional adviser before embarking on any financial planning activity. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the information contained in this communication is correct, we are not responsible for any errors or omissions.

Other News

7 Misconceptions About Working With A Financial Adviser

If you’re considering wealth management but are entirely new to the process, you likely have some assumptions and perhaps concerns about what working with a financial adviser is like. Numerous myths and misconceptions surround the financial advice service, some of which can deter those who are new to the process. In this blog, we’ll dispel […]

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UK Pensions – Act Now!

CoinsHSBC and The Local Government Pension Scheme are the latest Defined Benefit Pension Schemes to cause upset and worry to thousands of soon-to-be retirees.

Firstly, HSBC has come under fire for cutting the pension payouts of its former staff by up to £2,500 a year, affecting 50,000 members who joined the company between 1975 and 1996. This group had opted to pay less national insurance (NI) contributions whilst working by “contracting out” of the former state pension scheme. This meant that HSBC also paid less NI contributions. In exchange for paying a lower rate, the bank agreed to pay staff a guaranteed minimum pension when they came to retire. Payment records were however not properly maintained leading pensioners to be either overpaid or underpaid. Numerous firms, including HSBC, had used this arrangement and when the errors were discovered, some began to cut pension payouts to compensate for the overpayment.  

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